news

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23 sep '14

Towards2050 2014 edition gets under way

The theme for the next two weeks is Chinese-Dutch cooperation in the realm of sustainable urban development. The 2014 edition of Towards2050: Developing a Sino-Dutch Approach for Sustainable Urbanisation got under way on 14 September. The programme comprises workshops and seminars with Chinese and Dutch designers and experts, forming part of the Netherlands’ contribution to the Beijing Design Week.
Towards2050 is a multi-year programme initiated by the Creative Industries Fund NL in July 2013. The aim of this initiative is to test out the applicability of Dutch expertise in the field of urban development in the context of Chinese metropolitan regions. Chinese-Dutch design projects, research, week-long workshops, seminars and exchanges are also being organized within the framework of this programme.

The 2013 reconnaissance
The first exploratory work week was held in September 2013 during the Beijing Design Week. Dutch and Chinese participants tackled three pilot projects in Beijing that were proposed by a local stakeholder, the Fengtai District Planning Bureau. You can read more about this undertaking here.

Since then the interest in Towards2050 has grown, among Dutch as well as Chinese organizations, knowledge institutions and businesses. This shows there is a growing realization that today’s complex urban issues call for a multidisciplinary approach and international cooperation.

Transit-Oriented Development
This year’s theme is Transit-Oriented Development (TOD). Towards2050 is therefore working with Beijing Municipal Commission of Urban Planning, the Ministry of Housing, Urban and Rural Development, the Ministry of Transportation, the Ministry of Land and Resources, World Bank Beijing Office, Tsinghua University, China Railway Corporation, Beijing Institute of Architectural Design, China Architecture Design & Research Group, Beijing Municipal Institute of City Planning & Design, China Academy of Urban Planning & Design, UED Magazine, CMoDA and Beijing Design Week.

‘I’m pleased about the wide-ranging backgrounds and expertise of the Chinese and Dutch participants,’ says programme curator Ton Venhoeven. ‘There are various kinds of specialists, generalists, policy-makers and designers, from public as well as private institutions. They are working together with professors and students on projects that contribute to smart, competitive, sustainable and healthy urban regions.’

Cooperation
One special aspect of the programme is the close cooperation between designers and financial specialists. This teamwork was inspired by the Chinese government’s desire to improve the quality of life in cities by means of a market-oriented strategy rather than a planned economy approach. For China, the urban conurbations of the Netherlands and their interconnections represent an interesting practice, offering a solid basis for the sharing of expertise as well as capital flows – in both directions.

Organizations involved:
Beijing Municipal Commission on Urban Planning, Tsinghua University, Beijing Institute for Architectural Design, China Academy for Urban Planning and Design, China Architectural Design Research Group, Beijing Municipal Institute of City Planning & Design, the Royal Dutch Embassy in Beijing, the Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment, the Dutch Ministry of Education, Culture and Science, MVO Nederland (CSR Netherlands), the Delta Metropolis Association, the City of Utrecht, VenhoevenCS architecture+urbanism, René Kuiken Urbanism, Fabric, KCAP, MLA+, GroupA, Benthem Crouwel, Urhahn Urbanism, Fakton.

Project initiator:
Creative Industries Fund NL

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OpenOproepWerkweekBeijingSCI.jpg
23 sep '14

Towards2050 2014 edition gets under way

The theme for the next two weeks is Chinese-Dutch cooperation in the realm of sustainable urban development. The 2014 edition of Towards2050: Developing a Sino-Dutch Approach for Sustainable Urbanisation got under way on 14 September. The programme comprises workshops and seminars with Chinese and Dutch designers and experts, forming part of the Netherlands’ contribution to the Beijing Design Week.

more

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22 sep '14

A report from the Beijing work week Qinghe station

Last week, 30 professionals from the Netherlands and China collaborated intensively on a strategy for a station location in Beijing in the context of the Open Call for the Qinghe Station work week. This Open Call issued by the Creative Industries Fund NL was aimed at Dutch architects, landscape architects and urban planners, who from 14 to 20 September devised a Transit-Oriented Development (TOD) strategy for Qinghe Station in preparation for the construction of a new high-speed railway line, an assignment from the Beijing Municipal Commission on Urban Planning (BMCUP).

Thijs van Spaandonk reports:
China is currently making huge investments in infrastructure for high-speed trains. The stations for these trains have been designed like airports (with corresponding security and waiting times) rather than hubs of urban vitality. This means that much time and comfort is being sacrificed. Transferring to other modes of transport is suboptimal. In addition, the metro system is overburdened because of the city’s growth, and journey times and distances are too great.

Strategies on various scales were developed during the work week, in an effort to find strategic solutions for the abovementioned problems. These strategies were:

An integrated public transit structure for Beijing in which there are better connections between HSL, the metro and a newly introduced modality: the Rapid Train (an urban light-rail system).
What advantages does this interconnectivity offer for the two stations on the line – Beijing North Station (existing) and Qinghe Station (new) – that were part of our assignment? Here attention was devoted to interlinking the various modalities in relation to spatial quality and traveller comfort.
Opportunities for development around the two stations. Here the emphasis was on linking various programmatic zones around the stations, the quality of the public space and devising a programmatic mix that could contribute to further development of the station and its environs.

On Friday, 19 September the various participants presented these findings to an enthusiastic audience. Next week the outcomes will be discussed with the various stakeholders, such as local government and the World Bank, during events such as an International Forum on Transit-Oriented Development and the Beijing Design Week.

Participants in the work week:
Ton Venhoeven, Wu Weijia, Wu Chen, Cui Kai, Du Liqun, Zhang Bing, Huang He, Chen Yulin, Thijs van Spaandonk, Martijn de Geus, An Yue, Ni Jian, Dai Tianxing, Ren Yue, He Junqiao, Song Jing, Zhao Wenning, Liang Yingya, Sun Yuan, Yang Xu, Qiu Jie, Li Minhui, Wamg Liang, Zhen Tian, LI Jing, LV Wenjun, Liu Gang, Zhang Yizhang, Michel Duinmayer, Heleen Wijtmans, Joek Kruiderink, Marten Wassmann, Eric Frijters, Miriam Ram, Adam Visser, Brechtje Spreeuwers, John Breen, René Kuiken, Mark Dekker, Xun Huan, Ye Zhang.

Organizations involved:
Beijing Municipal Commission on Urban Planning, Tsinghua University, Beijing Institute for Architectural Design, China Academy for Urban Planning and Design, China Architectural Design Research Group, Beijing Municipal Institute of City Planning & Design, the Royal Dutch Embassy in Beijing, the Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment, the Dutch Ministry of Education, Culture and Science, MVO Nederland (CSR Netherlands), the Delta Metropolis Association, the City of Utrecht, VenhoevenCS architecture+urbanism, René Kuiken Urbanism, Fabric, KCAP, MLA+, GroupA, Benthem Crouwel, Urhahn Urbanism, Fakton.

Project initiator:
Creative Industries Fund NL

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WerkweekQinghestationBeijing.jpg
22 sep '14

A report from the Beijing work week Qinghe station

Last week, 30 professionals from the Netherlands and China collaborated intensively on a strategy for a station location in Beijing in the context of the Open Call for the Qinghe Station work week. This Open Call issued by the Creative Industries Fund NL was aimed at Dutch architects, landscape architects and urban planners, who from 14 to 20 September devised a Transit-Oriented Development (TOD) strategy for Qinghe Station in preparation for the construction of a new high-speed railway line, an assignment from the Beijing Municipal Commission on Urban Planning (BMCUP).

Thijs van Spaandonk reports:

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17 sep '14

AFFR organizes first architecture film festival in China

The first film festival about architecture and urban development to be held in China is taking place from 25 to 28 September in Beijing. The festival is being organized by the Architecture Film Festival Rotterdam (AFFR) in association with the Beijing Design Week (BJDW). The programme’s overarching theme is the management of the extreme growth of Chinese cities.
The film festival’s title is ‘We are the city’ and its programme was compiled by Jord den Hollander. Besides showing Dutch and Chinese films, there will also be productions about urban developments around the world. ‘In addition, a film about the parallels between two distinctive cycling cities – Amsterdam and Beijing – has been specially produced for the festival,’ the AFFR announced. ‘This film will be shown on one of the city’s largest projection screens every day.’

The BJDW attracts more than five million visitors per year, making it one of the world’s biggest events for architects, urban planners and designers. During the film festival there will be daily debates as well as film and architecture workshops for architecture students and young professionals. The Creative Industries Fund NL is supporting this event. Click here for the full programme.

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BeelduitfilmBeijingBicycle.jpg
17 sep '14

AFFR organizes first architecture film festival in China

The first film festival about architecture and urban development to be held in China is taking place from 25 to 28 September in Beijing. The festival is being organized by the Architecture Film Festival Rotterdam (AFFR) in association with the Beijing Design Week (BJDW). The programme’s overarching theme is the management of the extreme growth of Chinese cities.

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9 sep '14

Interested in manufacturing in Taiwan?

Taiwan has a burgeoning interest in design, so it is not for nothing that Taipei will be World Design Capital 2016. The Dutch Design Post (DDP) is a platform to promote Dutch design on the international stage.
Now that mass production has shifted to Taiwanese factories in China, Taiwan is concentrating on innovation and high-quality production. This relatively small island with a high concentration of business enterprises presents opportunities for Dutch designers. Are you a designer interested in manufacturing in Taiwan? DDP can help you prepare for the trip, facilitate matchmaking, assist you during your visit, and provide aftercare in order to maintain freshly established relations. DDP also offers residential accommodation in Tainan.

You can read about the application procedure via the 'How to apply' button at www.dutchdesignpost.com. The Dutch Design Post is being supported in the context of the Open Call: Exploring opportunities for internationalization.

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9 sep '14

Interested in manufacturing in Taiwan?

Taiwan has a burgeoning interest in design, so it is not for nothing that Taipei will be World Design Capital 2016. The Dutch Design Post (DDP) is a platform to promote Dutch design on the international stage.

more

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27 aug '14

Design strategy for water in Indian town Dwarka

In the first half of 2014, a team consisting of arch-I platform, the Dutch Water Design consortium, Studio Makkink & Bey and Wageningen University have developed the project Water in Dwarka, with the aim of mapping the water issues in Dwarka, an Indian town near New Delhi. Through design research and an intensive process with local stakeholders, the team articulated a series of concrete, implementable projects that will help address the water shortage.
It is expected that in 2050 more than 1 billion people will suffer from urban water shortages. Dwarka is a good example of a city where water shortages are already creating big problems for urban development. Planned in 1992 for 1.2 million inhabitants, 400.000 people live there now. Large parts are still undeveloped, and buildings are only partly occupied. Much of the water used in Dwarka is draining the local ground water, either through illegal pumps installed by the inhabitants, or by rogue tanker trucks. In a few decades, the water table has become so low that much of the ground water has become unusable.

The team approached the water issues holistically, using design to explore different opportunities, while integrating the different sectors and working with all stakeholders, from the local population to the Delhi Development Authority. The result is, a.o., an increased understanding, through designs and visualizations, of how water issues are connected to other issues such as livability (heat islands, quality of public spaces) and economics (urban agriculture, logistics). The team will continue to work in Dwarka on concrete projects, such as the further development, with the local authority, of a design strategy that links the stormwater system to the open spaces, which can subsequently be used for water retention and -harvesting.

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WaterinDwarka2.jpg
27 aug '14

Design strategy for water in Indian town Dwarka

In the first half of 2014, a team consisting of arch-I platform, the Dutch Water Design consortium, Studio Makkink & Bey and Wageningen University have developed the project Water in Dwarka, with the aim of mapping the water issues in Dwarka, an Indian town near New Delhi. Through design research and an intensive process with local stakeholders, the team articulated a series of concrete, implementable projects that will help address the water shortage.

more

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27 aug '14

New design together with South African designers

The Common Methods project was launched to connect Dutch creatives with South African designers and manufacturers around the themes of living, design and production. The programme was established to bring together designers from various countries and backgrounds and to employ local crafts in contemporary design.
The collaboration between designers Lio de Bruin and Phil Procter with their South African partners Mathew Neilson from Matblac and Natalie Du Toit from Indigi Designs got underway about a month ago. The two teams designed a series of eleven products in association with the local manufacturers and creators Woodheads, Bronze Age and Design Afrika. These objects were exhibited in Cape Town between 15 and 24 August.

This project was supported through the One Off Open Call for Participation in Milan, Cape Town and Austin.

Images: Michael Currin Photography
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LIODEBRUINxDESIGNAFRIKA.jpg
27 aug '14

New design together with South African designers

The Common Methods project was launched to connect Dutch creatives with South African designers and manufacturers around the themes of living, design and production. The programme was established to bring together designers from various countries and backgrounds and to employ local crafts in contemporary design.

more

Schellensfabriek.jpg
25 aug '14

Creative Industries Fund NL presents young talent at Dutch Design Week

During Dutch Design Week, Creative Industries Fund NL is organizing a presentation of work by young creative professionals who received a year of developmental support in 2013/2014. In No Particular Order showcases recent work by 21 young creatives who operate within the fields of architecture, design and e-culture. The exhibition and publication unravel the concept of talent and provide insight into various factors which can nurture its development.
“There is no uncontroversial standard for what gets to count as a talent,” says Agata Jaworska, curator of this exhibition and alumna of Design Academy Eindhoven. “Talent can take on any form, can consist of any quality, and may change at any time.” The talented individuals who are taking part in the presentation are Adriaan Aarnoudse, Aliki van der Kruijs, Arna Mackic, Beer van Geer, Boris de Beijer, Danny Cremers, Deniz Terli, Elisabeth Klement, Foteini Setaki, Irma Földényi, Jinhyun Jeon, Jólan van der Wiel, Jorge Bakker, Linda Valkeman, Maaike Fransen, Pauline van Dongen, Pieter Stoutjesdijk, Pinar Demirdag, Rick van der Linden, Rogier Delfos and Viola Renate.

First group presentation by recipients of Talent Development grants
Every year the Creative Industries Fund NL offers a platform for highly promising designers, architects and makers who have received support from the Grant Programme for Talent Development. This first showcase during Dutch Design Week will offer a wide-ranging, interested public and professional visitors the opportunity to become acquainted with these creative talents. The presentation at the Schellensfabriek also demonstrates what can be achieved thanks to publicly funded developmental support.

18–26 October 2014
11:00–20:00 daily
Schellensfabriek, Vestdijk 280, Eindhoven

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Schellensfabriek.jpg
25 aug '14

Creative Industries Fund NL presents young talent at Dutch Design Week

During Dutch Design Week, Creative Industries Fund NL is organizing a presentation of work by young creative professionals who received a year of developmental support in 2013/2014. In No Particular Order showcases recent work by 21 young creatives who operate within the fields of architecture, design and e-culture. The exhibition and publication unravel the concept of talent and provide insight into various factors which can nurture its development.

more

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25 aug '14

Applicants are satisfied with the Fund’s services

In May 2014, Blauw Research conducted an online survey among all the parties who have submitted an application to the Creative Industries Fund NL since 2013. The Fund’s provision of services was pivotal to this study, but it also addressed areas such as communication, policy and the application procedure.
“The Fund’s staff are engaged and very service-oriented. They respond to e-mails quickly and provide input for your ideas,” according to one of the respondents. The report reveals that 72% of applicants are broadly positive about the Fund’s provision of services; a large part could actually be described as enthusiastic. With feedback from 173 applicants, for the research bureau this provides a representative reflection of the whole group of applicants to the Fund. The results in this report provide a benchmark and can be regarded as an evaluation of the start that the fledgling Fund has made in the eyes of applicants.

Application procedure requires some effort
Some 63% of applicants find that submitting an application requires considerable effort on their part. The time required for the application in conjunction with the chances of success sometimes gives rise to a negative sentiment. The opportunity that the Fund offers to present a draft application to a member of staff is perceived as useful, but it also calls for extra work to finalize the application.

Several practical improvements with regard to the application procedure have now been implemented in the new online application environment, which has been available since 26 June 2014. The explanatory notes for each item are intended to simplify the process of completing an application. A point of criticism from applicants is that a grant programme’s guidelines and conditions are not always obvious, so the Fund aims to improve this with the launch of its new website this autumn.

The decision-making procedure
While 92% of the successful applicants are broadly positive about the decision, for unsuccessful applicants that holds for just 13%. This perception is closely linked with whether or not the application is successful, as one might expect. Successful as well as unsuccessful applicants are most critical about the comprehensiveness of the decision. The committee’s final advice that applicants receive by post is a legal document, a necessary component of the decision-making procedure. It allows only limited space for direct feedback about substantive aspects of the project.

Positive evaluation of means of communication
The online newsletter is read (at least in part) by 71% of applicants and is evaluated as good. Three-quarters of the applicants are complimentary about the Fund’s website. Six out of ten applicants (63%) is positive about the way in which the Fund accounts for its activities. "It is a public institution which must handle taxpayer’s money in a responsible way. Transparency and the provision of information are crucial to this, and in these two respects the Fund excellently fulfils its task as a provider of subsidies."

You can read the complete report of this client satisfaction study in the accompanied pdf (in Dutch).

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Klanttevredenheidsonderzoek.jpg
25 aug '14

Applicants are satisfied with the Fund’s services

In May 2014, Blauw Research conducted an online survey among all the parties who have submitted an application to the Creative Industries Fund NL since 2013. The Fund’s provision of services was pivotal to this study, but it also addressed areas such as communication, policy and the application procedure.

more

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13 aug '14

Gamescom report #3: I saw a visitor wiping away a tear.

Participating in Gamescom can be highly productive for these young, start-up independent game studios: finding a publisher for the game, seeking partners for ongoing development, networking or attempting to get some of the hundreds of journalists who are attending the fair to play your game.
Nick Aarts from Lionade Games: "This morning we’ve already managed to arrange meetings with publishers, this afternoon we’re sitting down with Sony. Visitors are already calling our game Check In, Knock Out a developers’ hit and the guy from Sony is going to play it with his colleagues."

At Gamescom everyone is welcome to play the selected games at the Holland Pavilion stand. Roel Ezendam from Ragesquid: "Action Henk seems to be cheering up visitors to the expo. The game is colourful and it’s easy to pick it up."

However, there are also games with a more serious note: Fragments of Him by SassyBot Studio is about coping with bereavement. "Someone from Dutch Cowboys walked past and actually wasn’t keen to play to game when he heard what the subject matter was," says game designer Tino van der Kraan. "But this game still intrigued him and he decided to try it, and at a certain point I noticed that he had to wipe away a tear. The game is moving, as it’s about exploring empathy and emotion, and it’s only when you play the game that you discover how it affects you. It’s something totally different to the explosions and flying limbs that you see plenty of in the games here at Gamescom. There’s also plenty of press and media: The Huffington Post and the Dutch newspaper Nederlands Dagblad already passed by this morning."
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StimuleringsfondsGamescom1.jpg
13 aug '14

Gamescom report #3: I saw a visitor wiping away a tear.

Participating in Gamescom can be highly productive for these young, start-up independent game studios: finding a publisher for the game, seeking partners for ongoing development, networking or attempting to get some of the hundreds of journalists who are attending the fair to play your game.

more

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13 aug '14

Gamescom report #2: As an indie, do something different

An early afternoon session at Gamescom allowed participants in the Holland Pavilion to pick the brains of experienced developers about how to pitch their games.
The people at this gathering last Tuesday afternoon included Adriel Wallick (MsMinotaur), renowned for trainjam and other games, Matthew Handrahan from gamesindustry.biz, J.W. Nijman of the game studio Vlambeer and the team from Digital Dreams, who are launching their game Metrico on PS Vita.

The most important tip from this Q&A session organized by the Creative Industries Fund NL was actually right in front of our noses: "As an indie, do something different! Don’t use your creativity just for your game; apply it to the way you present it as well. And be over-proactive and always bring stroopwafels!"

Let's see what fruits Gamescom will produce!
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12 aug '14

Gamescom Report#1: Adriaan de Jongh about Bounden

Eric Bartelson, co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of Control Magazine, attended the talk by Adriaan de Jongh (Game Oven) during the Independent Games Summit symposium that preceded the Gamescom fair (13–17 August) in Cologne. Game Oven is one of the ten studios being supported by the Creative Industries Fund NL to give a presentation during Gamescom.

By Eric Bartelson

Adriaan de Jongh of Game Oven knows what he’s talking about when it comes to challenging the audience to invent new genres. With Game Oven he has certainly enriched the world of games with ‘phone dancing’, ‘people touching’ and ‘friend chaining’.
According to De Jongh, your best chance of devising a new genre is in what he terms the ‘game mechanic genre’. “Here a smart game mechanic can already count as a new genre,” says De Jongh. “Take Fingle. We were the first to make a finger-touch game, and now you can see all kinds of rip-offs.” Thanks to his experience as a game developer, he now distinguishes six factors that contribute to the development of original games.

Vision "You must have a strong vision, because good game mechanics reinforce a vision. How to come up with a solid vision? Well, it’s different for everyone. For Salvador Dali, for example, it was the moment between waking and sleeping. That’s why he often sat in an armchair with a plate on his lap and a heavy metal key in his hand. If he fell asleep then he dropped the key, which then clattered noisily onto the plate. That was the moment he woke up with a jolt, immediately got up, and produced his surrealist paintings." De Jongh says that everybody has to search for their own inspiring place, because that is the spot where your vision takes shape.

Make weird shit “Try everything. Don’t be led by preconceived ideas that something isn’t or cannot be fun. Make everything that comes to mind. That is how you’ll discover which mechanic it closest to your vision", De Jongh argues, "often with unexpected results. I call it Adriaan de Jongh’s Orbital Approach.”

Throw everything away You have to dare, but it is really refreshing to throw away ideas and designs. “Artists have less difficulty with throwing away work if it isn’t up to scratch. Programmers, by contrast, prefer not to. It does mean that weeks of work are destroyed in one go. There should be some way in which programmers can also sketch with code in just a couple of hours.”

Prototype until it works “I make a prototype every day,” says De Jongh. But that alone is not enough. “You have to get as many different people as possible to play it and you have to open to criticism. All the criticism, no matter how harsh or stupid it is, is justified. Learn from it.”

Stop in time If a game that you’re developing doesn’t succeed, then don’t hesitate to stop. Don’t spend too long lingering, but simply pull the plug. That may be a severe decision, but De Jongh has reassuring words: “Stopping isn’t failing.”

Gather the right people "Surround yourself with the right people. Are they open to experimentation? Do they appreciate your opinion? A good team is unmissable."

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12 aug '14

Gamescom Report#1: Adriaan de Jongh about Bounden

Eric Bartelson, co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of Control Magazine, attended the talk by Adriaan de Jongh (Game Oven) during the Independent Games Summit symposium that preceded the Gamescom fair (13–17 August) in Cologne. Game Oven is one of the ten studios being supported by the Creative Industries Fund NL to give a presentation during Gamescom.

By Eric Bartelson

Adriaan de Jongh of Game Oven knows what he’s talking about when it comes to challenging the audience to invent new genres. With Game Oven he has certainly enriched the world of games with ‘phone dancing’, ‘people touching’ and ‘friend chaining’.

more

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5 aug '14

Special edition of Control Magazine about games supported by the Creative Industries Fund NL

The Creative Industries Fund NL is supporting 10 independent studios that are presenting their work in the Holland Pavilion at the Gamescom trade fair as a result of the Open Call for Participation in Gamescom Cologne. The games magazine Control is publishing a special Gamescom issue about the games which are featured in this presentation.
For its special “Dutch Indies” edition, Control Magazine interviewed the developers from the selected game studios about their latest projects. The Chairman of the Game Fund and the assistant secretary of the Creative Industries Fund NL have also contributed, offering tips about the best way to apply for grants and support. The magazine also highlights 11 special games that have recently been supported by the Game Fund.

Read the online version of the magazine here:



The Holland Pavilion is an initiative of the Dutch Games Association and this year it is being staged in partnership with the Creative Industries Fund NL, Control Magazine and the Dutch Game Garden. The 10 selected games are playable at the Holland Pavilion stand.Twitter along via #DutchIndies.

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